Joy

Do you remember when you were young and you would spin in a circle with your arms spread out, whirling and whirling until you dropped to the ground from the dizzies? You’d watch the clouds spin from your ground-level vantage point, if it didn’t make you too woozy. Essentially, you were self-inducing the same feeling you would later come to recognize as drunk. The point is, though, that you would spin in the circles for the simple joy of it. No need for someone to correct your technique or tell you that you were spinning wrong, there was only this moment when you played with gravity and gravity may have pulled you to the ground, but you still won. It was wondrous.

Then you “grew up,” stopped spinning because you realized that it gave you an upset stomach, or too closely reminded you of being drunk and nauseous. Other activities induced similar feelings of ‘glad to be in the moment’ for you: maybe it was spending time with friends, or spending alone time with a special someone, or reading a book, jumping from planes – whatever it was, you did this thing for the simple fact that it brought you joy.

Being joyful is a tricky proposition during adulthood because there’s so much that threatens it. How can a person be joyful when there’s so much pain? Joy isn’t a constant, or at least not for me, but it is there among the other emotions and deserves its nurturing too. We do ourselves a disservice when we refuse to allow ourselves that small respite from everything else we’re supposed to be doing to engage in the activities we love. I submit that our capacity for joy is one of the few things that makes life bearable. It isn’t money, or 500 skamillion friends, or an overabundance of things to do: it’s an appreciation of the moment, a connection to the very things that make us glad to be hanging around on this planet in the first place.

I am serious about protecting my own joy. This is an awkward time of year for many people, and definitely for me. I don’t handle conflicting demands on my time very well and instead usually opt to behave in a zombielike fashion because it’s easier that way. That is until this year when I promised myself I’d simplify. So far, and I admit it’s not even Thanksgiving yet, I’m doing well at cutting the excess out from the to-do list so that I can enjoy myself (go figure).

One of the most enjoyable activities for me this time of year is sending holiday greetings. Even though I’m killing trees and spending money on postage, I like to send a happy hello to another person that they can hold in their hands – like a 49 cent hug, I suppose. I know email is quicker and the graphics on my social media are all cute and what-not, but I haven’t put my hand to pen to cardstock so it doesn’t give me the same happy feeling that getting paper cuts on my tongue from licking envelopes does. That’s my unapologetic nod to doing a thing that makes me happy.

The other nod is that I love movies. On the big screen, popcorn beside the point. I love hanging out in an alternate reality for a length of time so that I can feel the feels without any sense of responsibility for them or any need to make them better. It’s the same reason I like to read, but my more immediate circle of friends understands the reading more than the movies. Why would I love to go spend too much money for a couple hours of escapism? Well, because it’s fun. The movie I saw yesterday, for its entire 130 minutes, momentarily filled a place in that part of me that still believes there is no problem that can’t be solved as long as we have hope. I left the theater with the same feeling I had when I used to whirl around in circles until I fell: a little woozy, but joyous.

As a warm-up with hopeful carryover beyond the New Year, I encourage us all to engage in the activities that bring us joy. They aren’t less important than our other commitments; that’s like saying our commitments to other things are more important than our commitment to our own health. That said, with all movie-going, card-sending joy in my heart, I encourage you to do the things that bring you joy. If it’s spending time with people, go do it. If it’s sitting around the house eating Cheetos, bring extra napkins to wipe that orange-y goodness off your fingers. If it’s writing your story, or telling your truth, or walking the dogs, go. You deserve the joy.

Deadpool was awesome, but not for kids

I went to see Deadpool today (loved it, won’t spoil it for anyone). I confess I haven’t read the eponymous Marvel comic, but I definitely appreciate the crotch-in-the-face irreverence of the movie. I don’t normally review movies because I’m not qualified, but I will make a recommendation: this movie isn’t for kids.

No doubt because of some alternate space-time continuum, there were people under seven years old at this movie. Maybe they weren’t actually seven; maybe they were middle-aged and wear their years extraordinarily well with that youthful joie de vivre that can only be called Gap Jr. I don’t normally care who attends which movie. However, there were kids sitting in bolster seats munching on fruit snacks. I love fruit snacks too, but I don’t need someone to buy my ticket for me and make sure I use the buddy system to go to the bathroom.

I admit, I am confused. Of all the movie choices out there, these young ones were at the movie most likely to require their parents to give them some version of The Talk or What Not To Say When You Go To School on Monday. I can maybe buy into the notion that the kids won’t find any of the violent scenes realistic. It was ridiculously CGI-generated even to my myopic eyeballs. I can sit through an X-Men movie with no worry for the little ones sitting next to me and things get blown to smithereens in those films as well. So what’s the difference between the usual Marvel comic movie and this?

Pretty much everything. The movie definitely earned its R rating, and while I don’t normally pay attention to ratings because I don’t have to, this one’s pretty obvious. Like I said, I loved the movie. I’d just feel a little awkward watching it while sitting next to my seven-year-old niece.